THaWS at Birket Habu – There is a camel on the line at Kom El Bir-at

Day four of this week’s work at Birket Habu and a 6.45 start meeting Reis Alaa, Reis Omer and the workmen. Our trip to work from the East to the West Bank didn’t go smoothly however, with a traffic jam on the bridge which lasted for an hour and a half before the blockage was cleared. We took the wrong carriageway across and joined the congestion.

Traffic!

Traffic!

Apart from the fact that our micro van was winged by a taxi at stand-still, the atmosphere was congenial, and gave the team some time for reflection on the possible work options for the day. A storm cloud also burst over the East Bank during our wait on the bridge.

Storm over the East Bank

Storm over the East Bank

After a long wait, however, we were able to get to the West Bank and meet our inspector and the remainder of the team. Dom, Sarah, Angus and Reis Alaa planned on working with the GPR from the Malkata heading east into Birket Habu, with Ginger and myself running the ERT across the entrance to the Birket. irst off though the GPS base station was set up.

Angus photographs the GPS base

Angus photographs the GPS base

More on the tasks and results of the days work will be put on to the EES blog. However, Ginger and I were stranded with the ERT at Kom el Bir-at, rolling along probes and cables. All went well during the course of the day until we were temporarily stopped by an inquisitive visitor, who sniffed a probe or two rather dismissively, then parked his backside down on the ERT line.

A camel on the line

A camel on the line

After a short while the first interloper headed off along the lane, and work proceeded smoothly. Some good readings along the profile showing up the varying resistivity of the deposits. Thankfully the second camel of the day showed absolutely no interest in the survey whatsoever, and work proceeded to a smooth finish.

You wait for a camel then two come along at once

You wait for a camel then two come along at once

More information on the progress of the THaWS work can be viewed on the EES website, and the project blog at http://eestheban.tumblr.com/.

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Filed under Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey

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